The Customer Success Movement Is Taking The Business World By Storm

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin
Star Wars Androids
Oscar.go.com – Star Wars Droids – 2016 Oscars

Interview with Gainsight’s CCO, Dan Steinman. February 2016

By Sue Nabeth Moore, Customer Success Enthusiast, Paris 

In the momentum around customer success, I’m pleased to share my recent interview with Dan Steinman, CCO (and Skywalker) from Gainsight. In keeping with the theme of the Oscars last weekend, this inspiring interview is split into a “SaaS Wars Trilogy” which you’re invited to follow over the next week. It also casts an avant-première at Gainsight’s new book – Customer Success – How Innovative Companies Are Reducing Churn And Increasing Revenue, to be officially published on 7th March. 

Trilogy Episodes: 

1) New Hope: SaaS Wars – A New Business Model and The Growing Importance of Customer Success

2) Innovative Vendors Strike Back – Vendors Organize Themselves for Customer Success

3) Return of “The Wall Street”– Evangelism of Customer Success Value and Return on Investment 

Episode 1 – New Hope: SaaS Wars

A New Business Model and The Growing Importance of Customer Success.

Sue: Thanks for accepting this interview Dan. Firstly, how do you define the role of customer success ?

Dan: I’d like to present my pictorial. Imagine that there’s a gap between what your product has the ability to do and how your customers are actually using it. Every company should have that gap. That’s because it shows that you’re innovating on your product. Customers can never keep up if you’re innovating at a good pace.

Customer success is there to narrow that gap, by bringing the bottom line closer to the top line. By getting your customers to use more of your product, this brings a direct correlation to loyalty, value and all those other wonderful things we want to happen: renewal, up sell, cross sell and advocacy…

Sue: I like the gap pictorial Dan. I know there’s a lot of momentum around customer success right now and Gainsight has even coined the so-called “Customer Success Movement”. Yourself, Nick Mehta, (CEO of Gainsight) and Lincoln Murphy have just written a book on the subject. Can you give us a little avant-première insight please? Is it going to be the “bible” of the customer success movement?

Gainsight Book on Customer SuccessDan: Well I would probably use the word bible pretty carefully:) Let’s say it’s the first book of the new customer success movement. The terminology of “customer success” has been used before. But in the new world order where subscriptions are king and customer success is a necessity in a subscription company, this is the kind of first book. It won’t be the last. I know of least three other people who are writing a customer success book. I’m proud that we got there first and that we’re taking on a leadership role.

The book covers different aspects. Firstly, the history of customer success and how we got here. It explains what the subscription tsunami is all about and how that turned into the customer success movement. The middle of the book deals with a lot of practical advise on how we do it, what we like to call the ten laws of customer success. At the end, we cast a look at what the next five or ten years will look like. From a tongue in cheek point of view, we think we’ll be seeing customer success droids flying around in Google self-flying cars ensuring that every customer has a customer success droid helping them do their thing. The total cost of doing customer success at the highest possible level will be around a nickel a year! So I don’t think that’s realistic but at least that is the direction that we’re trying to go in. By necessity, customer success will become more and more valuable in the subscription world that we live in.

Sue : That sounds like a wonderful futuristic world for customer success. I mentioned the bible and you talk about the ten laws of customer success:) So when will the book be published ?

Dan: Well I didn’t correlate that before and there are definitely no stone tablets provided with the book:) The book is completed. It’s on the printing press right now and available in Amazon. The official publication is March 7th so before the world runs out of paper, you can hurry up and get your copy now:)

Sue :Well I’ll definitely order my copy on Amazon and would love you to personally sign it for me*.

With all the current buzz, how do you position the role of customer success compared to more traditional roles, e.g. sales, account management, professional services, support, marketing … ?

Dan: Yes, a little history I think helps answer this question. The history has to do with the shift in the changing business model from the enterprise to the subscription economy. Let’s just use those high level terms. One of the main things that the subscription economy drives is the focus on customers.

In the enterprise economy, we used to be able to sell to a customer once and not really worry about revenue afterwards. In those days, 90% of all of the money was collected at the time of the first deal. Now that has flipped completely. Today less than 10% of all the money we’re going to collect from you is collected at the time of the first deal. The other 90% comes after that in the form of renewal, contracts and up sells. So if 90% of all the business I can potentially generate is after the first deal, we need a team of people who are going to help manage those customers to make sure they wish to renew those contracts.

It’s a little bit like taking subscription to the very basic level of magazine subscriptions. If I sell you an annual magazine subscription, I better do something which delivers value to you so that you renew your subscription. I can’t just ship you a piece of empty paper! I have to give you content, pictures and whatever exciting things you want in that magazine. The same thing is true now in the software world with a subscription recurring revenue. Customer success is not about delivering just another product but about delivering a value, an outcome and ultimately success. If I do that for you, you are likely to renew your contract. If I have more products to sell, you are likely to at least look at those and potentially buy them too.

Sue: We’re really witnessing a power shift where power is now in the hands of the client.

Dan: That’s absolutely right. There is a significant power shift from vendor to customer that has driven this customer success movement. Since you spoke about power shifts, there is another second shift inside of companies going from sales to post sales, basically from acquisition to retention.

In a SaaS company what usually happens after about four to five years of existence is that more dollars are coming from the installed base rather than coming from new acquisition sales. I like to use Salesforce as the analogy because they’re the most mature SaaS company. Next year Salesforce will be around a $10 billion company. Out of that, somewhere in the region of $8 billion will come from the installed base and not from new sales. That’s a significant power shift. So, if you’re the CFO at Salesforce, who are you talking to most about next year’s forecast, the one who has the $2B number or the one who has the $8B number?

Coming soon… Episode 2: Innovative Vendors Strike Back

*I have since ordered my copy of the book on Amazon for my Kindle….It’s a recommended read!

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin